Lordship of Connerton(or Conarton) and Penwith

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Ellery
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Lordship of Connerton(or Conarton) and Penwith

Post by Ellery » Thu Sep 09, 2010 6:16 am

After reading all the legal mumbo jumbo I am publicly claiming the Lordship of Connerton(or Conarton) and Penwith.

I have good ancestral links to both the Arundells and Paynters.

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Marhak
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Re: Lordship of Connerton(or Conarton) and Penwith

Post by Marhak » Thu Sep 09, 2010 7:58 am

Well, the manor cattle pound still exists at Gwithian.

Karesk
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Re: Lordship of Connerton(or Conarton) and Penwith

Post by Karesk » Thu Sep 09, 2010 9:43 am

Pypynag a yllta gul, gwella y hallav y wul. My yw Duk yn oll Kernow!

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Marhak
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Re: Lordship of Connerton(or Conarton) and Penwith

Post by Marhak » Thu Sep 09, 2010 1:58 pm

Details of both manors can be found in P.A.S. Pool's "The Tithings of Cornwall" (Journal of the Royal Institution of Cornwall 1981).

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Ellery
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Re: Lordship of Connerton(or Conarton) and Penwith

Post by Ellery » Thu Sep 09, 2010 5:05 pm

If I can use it to exert any influence over English Heritage, National Trust, Natural England et al. I will. :twisted:


The Lordship of Penwith originally came with an awful lot of power. You could maybe view it as the Marcher Lordship of the Duchy.

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Ellery
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Re: Lordship of Connerton(or Conarton) and Penwith

Post by Ellery » Thu Sep 09, 2010 7:00 pm

Ancient and modern Division of the County.

When the survey of Domesday was taken, the county of Cornwall was divided into seven hundreds; Conarton, Fawiton, Pawton, Rialton, Stratton, Tibesta or Tibesterna, and Winneton or Winnenton. There are now nine hundreds; East, West, Powder, and Kerrier, in the southern part of the county; Stratton, Lesnewth, Trigg, Pyder, and Penwith, in the north and north-west. The alteration of the hundreds took place between the years 1088, when the survey was taken, and 1288, the time of the Lincoln taxation. Dr. Borlase says, that it would not be easy to discover the limits of the ancient divisions, or to reconcile it with the present. "Conarton," he continues, "it may be asserted with great probability, included the present hundred of Penwith; for the lord of the manor of Conarton has been lord also of all the hundred of Penwith from the time of Henry III.; among the rest there is not the like connexion, but what was anciently called Tibesta, included, as I imagine, the hundred of Poudre; Winnenton, Kerrier; Stratton, formerly extensive, makes at present the three small hundreds of Stratton, Lesnewth, and Trigg; Fawiton contained the hundred of East, as I suppose, and the southern part of West hundred; Rialton most part of Pidre; and Pauton the rest of Pidre, and the hundred of West." The hundreds of East and West were formerly called East and West Wivellshire or Wellshire. Norden calls the hundred of Trigg the hundred of Bodannan alias Trigg. All the hundreds of Cornwall, from time immemorial, belonged to the Earls, and still continue to be attached to the duchy, except the hundred of Penwith; and of this, two-thirds continued to belong to the duchy in the reign of James I., the other third, together with the bailiffry of the hundred, as attached to the manor of Conarton, was granted, at an early period, to the family of Pincerna, and descended to the Arundells, who eventually became possessed of the entire lordship of the hundred. The manor of Conarton, and the hundred of Penwith, were lately purchased of Lord Arundell, of Wardour, by Sir Christopher Hawkins, Bart. The bailiffry of the hundred of Stratton was attached to the manor of Norton-Rolle, in Lawncells; that of East to an estate called Tymbrelham, or Temple-park; that of West to Pengelly, in St. Neot; that of Trigg to Bodannan, in Endellion; that of Pyder to Rialton; and that of Kirrier to Penwarne, in Mawnan. Some of them still continue to be so attached; others have been separated. As no mention is made, either in the printed Domesday or in the MS. belonging to the church of Exeter, of the hundreds in which the manors described were severally situated, except certain manors, which appear by the Exeter MS. to have been in the hundred of Winianton, it would be impossible to form thence (except partially with respect to that hundred now Kirrier) any comparative view of the respective limits of the ancient and modern hundreds. The same circumstance renders it very difficult to appropriate the ancient names of manors to more modern names; but it will be attempted, as far as possible, in the tables of Domesday manors, which will be given under the head of Ancient Landholders.

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Ellery
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Re: Lordship of Connerton(or Conarton) and Penwith

Post by Ellery » Thu Sep 16, 2010 10:39 pm

Manor of Connerton and the Hundred of Penwith: came into the lordship of the Arundells in circa 1320 as a result of the marriage of Remfrey Arundell to Alice de Lanherne in circa 1268. Alice had inherited Connerton and Penwith from her mother Margaret Pincerna and they reverted to the Arundell line after the deaths of Alice and her second husband John Umfraville. Sold in 1813 to Sir Christopher Hawkins.
Manorial centre was in Gwithian; tenements also in Crowan, Gulval, Gwinear, St Ives, Lelant, Phillack and Welcombe parish in Devon. Lordship of the Hundred of Penwith (the only Cornish hundred in private hands) gave the Arundells the rights to try certain cases of trespass, trespass on the law, debt and detinue, to appoint a jailor for the detention of persons apprehended, to receive high-rent from the lords of the principal manors and to claim the regalia of the navigable rivers and havens, the profits of the royal gold and silver mines, and all wrecks, escheats, deodands, treasure trove, waifs, estrays, goods of felons and droits of admiralty happening within the hundred.

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Marhak
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Re: Lordship of Connerton(or Conarton) and Penwith

Post by Marhak » Thu Sep 16, 2010 11:02 pm

Interesting. Those rights would seem to override the Duke's.

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Ellery
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Re: Lordship of Connerton(or Conarton) and Penwith

Post by Ellery » Fri Sep 17, 2010 12:05 am

as it says above:

All the hundreds of Cornwall, from time immemorial, belonged to the Earls, and still continue to be attached to the duchy, except the hundred of Penwith; and of this, two-thirds continued to belong to the duchy in the reign of James I., the other third, together with the bailiffry of the hundred, as attached to the manor of Conarton, was granted, at an early period, to the family of Pincerna, and descended to the Arundells, who eventually became possessed of the entire lordship of the hundred.

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Marhak
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Re: Lordship of Connerton(or Conarton) and Penwith

Post by Marhak » Fri Sep 17, 2010 8:09 am

The Arundells are certainly prominent in Cornish history: Humphry who led the Cornish forces in 1549 (and was betrayed by his little quisling of a secretary, John Kessell); and John who held out against the Civil War siege of Pendennis, spring straight to mind. They also held Trengwainton for a century or so after 1692 and married into the Harrises of Kenegie, creating double and even triple-barrelled names! (e.g. William Arundell-Harris-Arundell, son of the Revd. William Arundell-Harris d. 1798, and who sold Kenegie to Thomas Ellis in 1830).

shaz
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Re: Lordship of Connerton(or Conarton) and Penwith

Post by shaz » Sat Sep 18, 2010 9:15 pm

Marhak do you know anything about Scottish history names, I seem to have stumbled across some in my family tree... :o

Is Paddy getting on ok?

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Marhak
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Re: Lordship of Connerton(or Conarton) and Penwith

Post by Marhak » Sat Sep 18, 2010 9:58 pm

Being half-Scots (on the maternal side), I should and, thanks to a couple of great books, have good info right here. (Puts a glint in yere eye an' a tilt in yere kilt!). Last time I looked up my family tree, I found that half of them were still living in it!

Paddy's doing fine and has out a good deal of weight back on. Whether the old guy's to be retired hasn't been decided yet. Hope not - especially after today. Had the most horrendous ride I've had in 50 years! Under saddle, Maple is, at best, a ticking time-bomb and I've been waiting for her to explode. Today, she did. No warning - BANG! Took off like an Exocet and unleashed the biggest, highest, twistiest buck I've ever experienced. I actually glimpsed both hind feet over my right shoulder. How the hell I sat that, I'll never know - it seems that age hasn't slowed the old goalkeeper's reactions for which I am truly grateful! By rights, I should have hit the tarmac. I had her in 5 seconds, managing to spin her 90 degrees left to face a 6 foot stone hedge with no where to go. The rest of the ride was her frantic, fast-rate jog which is basically her strength v mine. And her strength is colossal. She's an inch smaller than Paddy, who's a chunky enough chap, but her shoulders are half as broad again as his. She's a genuine Gypsy cob, bred to pull wagons. Up through Tregeseal I was literally gasping for breath - but so was she. By the top of Tregeseal Hill, she'd almost worn herself out, so I deliberately drove her up the steepest last bit until she was almost on her knees. THEN she went home at the walk. Back at the yard, I was the one on my knees, shaking like a bloody jelly. Now, Maple doesn't believe she's done anything wrong at all and her rider is the best thing since sliced bread for taking her out and giving her fun. She's all over me and I'm barking at her and shoving her away to show displeasure, but she's so sweet that you just can't keep that up. Definitely too old for that. Enjoyable it wasn't, and was downright bloody dangerous. I'm near 60, for Christ's sake, with one heart attack under my belt and blood-pressure that, according to the quacks, could power several turbines. Maple needs a strong experienced 35-year old rider. I want my ole plod of a drinking partner back! Or Shogun.

shaz
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Re: Lordship of Connerton(or Conarton) and Penwith

Post by shaz » Sun Sep 19, 2010 10:12 pm

Mine is paternal side and a long time ago...

Thanks for that story Marhak, 8-) made us laugh... :D Glad Paddy is doing ok, such a gentle soul, I take it Shogun is well behaved being an ex police horse?

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Marhak
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Re: Lordship of Connerton(or Conarton) and Penwith

Post by Marhak » Sun Sep 19, 2010 11:11 pm

Yesterday's efforts actually cracked a rib, left side of my chest! Must be a stress injury as no impacts occurred, probably when I fought to spin her round to halt the charge and. at the same time trying to stay in the saddle. After all, when it's 14 stone against half a ton of muscle, something's bound to give and it ain't going to be the half-ton of muscle. I can still lift a pint, so nothing of any concern. Shogun never actually served as a police horse but he had the full training as a youngster as a favour to his owner.

Anyway, I had a serious word with Di this morning and she suggested that next week, we put Maple between shafts and go for a long drive which is just what the mare was bred to do. Cracked rib or no, I'm up for that. As for Paddy, I'll be glad when he's back at the yard - I miss the ole bugger's humour.

Enough of my aches and pains. What Scottish names did you want to know about?

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